ASEAN and RoK : More Than Just Alternative Partnership

Vol. V / No. 2 | March 2024

Authors:
Wildan Faisol (Lecturer at the Department of International Relations, Universitas Al Azhar Indonesia)

Summary

The region of Southeast Asia and Korea is bound by historical ties of Japanese colonialism in the mid-20th century. Currently the two regions are again bound in more strategic aspects such as aspects of economic cooperation and defense technology through the multilateral cooperation framework of ASEAN and the Republic of Korea or bilaterally. involving each of the ASEAN member countries. In a political context, Southeast Asian countries are in the midst of a sovereignty dispute with China, establishing deeper relations with the Republic of Korea as a strategic partner is ideal. From an economic aspect, in the shadow of the threat of debt trap diplomacy practiced by China, building a strategic economic cooperation framework with the Republic of Korea is an ideal solution. According to the author, this collaboration should receive serious attention from policy makers because the Republic of Korea does not have hegemonic interests in the Southeast Asia region.

Keywords: ASEAN, Southeast Asia ,Korea, Defense, Economy

KASI  and Korea-Indonesia Middle Power Interests: Converging the Differences?

KASI and Korea-Indonesia Middle Power Interests: Converging the Differences?

Vol. V / No. 1 | March 2024

Authors:
Resi Qurrata Aini (Associate Lecturer at the Department of International Relations, Universitas Indonesia)

Summary

After deferring its support for the US terminology of Free and Indo-Pacific Initiative (FOIP) during the past Moon Jae-in administration, Korea is getting bolder by launching its own conception of Indo-Pacific strategy in the current Yoon Suk-yeol rule.  Yoon first disclosed it at the ASEAN-Korea Summit on 11 November 2022. He complemented it by launching the Korea-ASEAN Solidarity Initiative (KASI), reiterated a few days later at a side event of the G20 Meeting in Bali. This diplomatic gesture reflects the acknowledgment of ASEAN and Indonesia as prominent for Korea Indo-Pacific Strategy. As the facto key driver of ASEAN and the chairman of ASEAN in 2023, Indonesia’s response to Korea’s Indo-Pacific conception and KASI will significantly influence how ASEAN bring it on and determine the implementation of KASI. This commentary will discuss how Indonesia perceives KASI and whether it would be a pathway to elevate Indonesia-Korea middle power strategy in dealing with geopolitical turbulences in the region. They will be assessed from Indonesia’s development priorities, geopolitical dynamics, and Korea-Indonesia middle-power interests.

Keywords: KASI, Power Interest, FOIP, Indonesia-Korea, ASEAN.

KASI  and Korea-Indonesia Middle Power Interests: Converging the Differences?

Assessment of Climate Change Impacts and Mitigation in ASEAN: Heavily Impacted with Unestablished Commitment to Act

Vol. IV / No. 7 | November 2023

Authors:
Ali Abdullah Wibisono (Associate Professor at the Department of International Relations, Universitas Indonesia)
Ahmad Hidayat (Associate researcher at the Department of International Relations, Universitas Indonesia and and Carbon Policy Lab by CarbonEthics)

Summary

Climate change has become a significant issue in ASEAN, considering the critical geographical and socio-economic developments that intensify natural disasters, food insecurity, and territorial and migration conflicts. It transformed the climate change/environmental problem from potential risks into a real, pervasive threat to survival. Unfortunately, ASEAN has yet to see concerted significant regional efforts to achieve a global standard of climate change mitigation, preventing a 1.5°C temperature rise by 2100. ASEAN member states’ Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) have not aligned with the Paris Agreement as commitment varies regarding targets, strategies, and monitoring and evaluation control. The regional efforts to combat climate change could not yet qualify as an established commitment to act. Differentiated obligations based on historical emissions should be elaborated with investment, technology development, and green infrastructure to support net-zero, which should be promoted unconditionally or conditionally to international support in ASEAN countries.

Keywords: ASEAN, Climate Change Mitigation, Commitment, Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC), Southeast Asia

KASI  and Korea-Indonesia Middle Power Interests: Converging the Differences?

Sinking Coastal Cities as An Urgent Issue in the Southeast Asia Region and the Need for the Transnational Resilient City

Vol. IV / No. 8 | November 2023

Authors:
Muhammad Fatahillah, M.Si. (Associate researcher at the Department of International Relations, Universitas Indonesia)

Summary
Sea level rise is a real threat that can sink several cities in the coastal area of Southeast Asia region (ASEAN). This threat is not only experienced by small cities, but also threatens large cities and even those with the status of capitals of ASEAN member countries such as Jakarta, Bangkok, Hanoi, Manila, and Singapore. Unfortunately, this issue is only seen as part of the natural impact of the global warming phenomenon and the steps taken still appear sporadic according to the capacity of each country/city. Therefore, seriousness is needed in responding to this issue, one of which is by building cooperation and multilateralism in the form of a City Resilient Network against the threat of sinking coastal cities in the Southeast Asia region (ASEAN).

Keywords: ASEAN, land subsidence, sea level rise, sinking coastal cities, transnational resilient city networks.

KASI  and Korea-Indonesia Middle Power Interests: Converging the Differences?

A Preliminary Overview of “Wokeism”: Three Major Issues for IR Research

Vol. IV / No. 6 | September 2023

Authors:
Devina Ayona (currently working under the KaLi Project)

 

Summary

Recent political events have brought the word “woke” to the center of public and media attention. What began as a domestic issue in the U.S. has begun to spread to other parts of the globe and become a heated topic of discussion. This commentary suggests that it is time for IR scholars, especially from non-Western countries, to contribute to the discussion. Nevertheless, IR scholars will need to take note that “wokeism” scholarship is characterized by (1) a lack of academic literature using “wokeism” as their keyword; (2) political quarrels over the meaning of “wokeism”; and (3) lack of non-Western perspective. IR scholars may begin approaching the subject using structural, postcolonial, and transnational frameworks of analysis.

Keywords: woke, wokeism, wokeness, postcolonialism, non-Western IR

KASI  and Korea-Indonesia Middle Power Interests: Converging the Differences?

Bringing the Nature Back in: Situating International Relations in The Anthropocene

Vol. IV / No. 5 | September 2023

Authors:
Shofwan Al Banna Choiruzzad  (Lecturer, Department of International Relations, Universitas Indonesia)
Equanjana Fatah (Master Student, Department of International Relations, Universitas Indonesia)

Summary

The Anthropocene era brings evolving challenges to international relations. The impact of human activities on the earth system makes it impossible for us not to put IR within the Anthropocene context. IR should include the Anthropocene context in theoretical and practical debates to stay relevant to current conditions. When IR recognizes the Anthropocene in a limited context, the debates will round at resulting partial and incomplete responses in facing this era’s complex and urgent challenges.

Keywords: Anthropocene, human activities, ecological challenges, international politics, environmental crises